Mining wage

Minimum wage rises to $15.65 an hour in British Columbia, officials say


Minimum wage workers across British Columbia will soon see a wage increase of 45 cents more per hour, according to the province’s labor minister.


In an announcement Monday, Harry Bains said the general minimum wage would be raised to $15.65 an hour, effective June 1, 2022.


“The 45-cent increase is based on BC’s average annual inflation rate in 2021,” says Bains. “At 2.8% for the year, British Columbia’s inflation in 2021 was the highest since 1993.”


Along with changes to the general minimum wage, Bains also announced a 2.8% increase in alternative minimum wages, for “resident camp leaders, resident home support and resident caretakers.”


The new wages for these workers will come into effect on January 1, 2023.


This is a developing story and will be updated. The previous story follows.


British Columbia’s Minister of Labor makes an announcement Monday on the provincial minimum wage.


Few details were provided ahead of the announcement, but Harry Bains is expected to be joined by other guests at the Old Surrey restaurant.


Earlier this year, the government promised in its Speech from the Throne to tie minimum wage increases to the rate of inflation. It is unclear whether Monday’s announcement will relate to upcoming rate changes in British Columbia


Last year the province raised the minimum wage from $14.60 to $15.20. In addition, the $13.95 hourly minimum wage for liquor servers has been replaced by the general minimum wage.


At the time the rates changed, the province said the salary specific to liquor servers disproportionately affected women.


“Around 80% of alcohol servers are women, and the low alcohol pay is a clear example of the gender pay gap we are fighting to close,” said Grace Lore, Parliamentary Secretary to gender equality, in a press release last May.


“Most minimum wage earners are women, often racialized women and newcomers who face barriers to accessing higher paying jobs. We need to work towards wages workers can actually live on instead of being held back.

Read the original article here

Disclaimer! Verve Times is an automatic aggregator of all media in the world. In each content, the hyperlink to the main source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the content owner and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – [email protected]. Content will be deleted within 24 hours.